TikTok trend sees influencers inhale tanning nasal sprays


Something smells off with this new nasal spray trend.

Beauty influencers are taking to TikTok to show themselves snorting sprays that they claim give them a golden tan — but doctors warn the products could be both ineffective and dangerous.

The tanning nasal sprays — many of which are available for sale in the US — all claim to increase production of melanin in the skin after they are inhaled.

Popular British TikTokker @hannahtayy shared a short video to the social media site which showed her using one of the products.

“I mean I’d rather die hot than live ugly,” the beauty influencer lip-synched in the clip, which has been liked more than 130,000 times.

“So if this is going to take 10 years off my life, I don’t care. I don’t want to be old anyway, old people are ugly,” the blond continued as she popped the top of the spray and put it up her nostril.

Several fans left comments claiming they were eager to try the spray in a bid to gain a golden glow during the depths of winter.

Dozens of other videos — all of which have amassed thousands of likes — show other young women inhaling the nasal sprays.

Many TikTokkers say they snort the substances before heading to a solarium, as ingredients in the sprays allegedly help increase the effectiveness of tanning beds.

A Google search of tanning nasal sprays brings up multiple products retailing from just $29 — but experts say shoppers should think twice before buying.

“In the US, all nasal sprays or inhalation solutions are classified as drugs, which means they need to go through a New Drug Application process in order to legally be able to sell in the US,” cosmetic biochemist Krupa Koestline told Allure.

The publication claims many of the sprays contain dihydroxy methylchromonyl palmitate — “a self-tanning ingredient which helps increase melanin production when used topically.”

However, the ingredient has not been approved for inhalation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

A young woman is seen inhaling a tanning nasal spray in a recent TikTok video.
A young woman is seen inhaling a tanning nasal spray in a recent TikTok video.
TikTok

“There’s no proven safety of ingesting dihydroxy methylchromonyl palmitate at all,” dermatologist Dr. Nancy Samolitis further told the publication. “Whether or not it works, we don’t know.”

Meanwhile, Dr. R. Peter Manes, a rhinologist with Yale Medicine, told Everyday Health that inhaling unapproved substances can result in a number of serious side effects that could last indefinitely.

“Nasal use of medications can affect things like one’s sense of smell. They can also potentially be toxic to the cilia of the nose, which allow the nose to move mucus through it normally,” he stated.

An influencer is seen using the tanning nasal spray in a video that racked up thousands of views.
An influencer is seen using the tanning nasal spray in a video that racked up thousands of views.
TikTok / @meganpxige

Nasal tanning sprays are the latest dangerous beauty trend on TikTok. Last year, The Post recapped some of the other ill-advised trends that have taken off on the social media site, including tooth filing and a “face wax challenge.”



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.